Monday, July 27, 2015

NEWLY REVAMPED: Hymns and Miscellaneous Responsories

HYMNS AND MISCELLANEOUS REPONSORIES (Link is to the alpha index!)

Re-worked for better margins, fonts, etc.  Also, accent marks on any lyric in Latin (also done in Psalm 151 and in Alleluias and Gospel Acclamations).

Some of these also match with certain propers within certain Masses.  The liturgical calendar links on the sidebar will help find if there are any matches.

Some tunes are completely original, while some are based on chant themes (namely those chant melodies given to the propers in the Graduale Romanum).

Enjoy!
BMP

VERBUM SUPERNUM PRODIENS

One of the things I always liked about St. Thomas Aquinas is his uncanny ability to make two hymns out of one.  For example, the last two verses of Sacris Solemniis is Panis Angelicus; the last two verses of Pange Lingua is Tantum Ergo.  In the hymn we're featuring today, set to an original tune based in part on the Gregorian In Splendoribus Sanctorum, the last two verses of the Verbum Supernum Prodiens is the O Salutaris Hostia.

PDF: Verbum Supernum Prodiens - SATB hymn

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TO US A CHILD OF HOPE IS BORN

Based on the Christmas Introit Puer Natus Est Nobis in both text and tune.  The 18th century hymn text is by John Morrison.  The tune is original, based on the Introit melody from the Liber Usualis (or Graduale Romanum, or Gregorian Missal, for that matter).  Incidentally, originally, I wrote the tune in a major key, realized later that this would look and sound a lot better in the mixolydian mode.


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Sunday, July 26, 2015

THE LORD ALMIGHTY REIGNS

The text, based on Psalm 93, comes from The Psalter of 1912.  The tune, original, based on the Gregorian Dominus Regnavit, the Alleluia for the Mass at Christmas Dawn.  Short and sweet (four short meter verses).  Also makes for a great hymn of praise to Christ the King.

PDF - The Lord Almighty Reigns - SATB hymn

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Saturday, July 25, 2015

REMEMBER, LORD, THY SERVANTS

This piece of music is an attempt to eliminate two "ditties" from your typical run-of-the-mill parish repertoire. Here are two hints to see if you can guess what those ditties are.  The first hint is the antiphon, "Remember, Lord, thy servants, when thou dost take thy throne."  Got it?  Good.  Here is the second hint: the verses are based on the Beatitudes.  I think those who are also in favor of trying to eliminate the two "ditties" with this one piece know of which "ditties" I speak. ;)

The tune and the paraphrases are completely original.  BTW, this setting has now been incorporated into my "Psalm 151" project as the Communion for Sunday IV (A) and All Saints.

responsory with antiphon and Gelineau-like Psalm tone

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PUER NATUS IN BETHLEHEM

One of my favorite Christmas tunes, in the mysterious Mode I chant.  Like How Joyful My Expressing, this piece comes in two versions: a hymn and an anthem.  The hymn is just the basic Mode I melody with my own simple accompaniment.  The anthem is for SATB, with a verse for men's voices, a verse for women's/boys' voices, an SATB verse to be sung a capella, and finally the full-blown final verse which ends in fortissitissimo (triple forte).

PDF's


Puer Natus in Bethlehem - SATB anthem, accompanied

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O THAT I COULD FOR EVER DWELL

A short, simple unison hymn based on the passage of Psalm 27 (26) used for the Gradual for the Solemnity of the Holy Family (though a devotional hymn that could be sung at almost any occasion).  The text is written by Elizabeth Holmes Reed (1794-1867).  In writing the tune, I used part of the Gregorian Unam Petii melody as its base.  "Noble simplicity" defined here!

PDF: O That I Could for Ever Dwell - Unison hymn

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Friday, July 24, 2015

LUCIS CREATOR OPTIME

The Latin Vesper hymn of Pope St. Gregory the Great, wedded to an original hymn tune.  My first intent was to name the tune Hymn 2000, but later felt that might have been too "high tech", or maybe to "science fiction", or something like that.  Plus, GIA Publications would need a #2000 for some hymn in the future at the pace they keep updating their hymnals (Gather Super-Duper Comprehensive, Umpteenth to the Umpteenth Power Edition).  So I went with the more generic title, Hymn of Light.

The tune I wrote comes in two forms in one .pdf.  On the first page is the standard SATB harmony with a descant for the final verse, while the second page contains a faux-bourdon harmony (melody is in the tenor).

SATB hymn with descant and faux-bourdon

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LORD, YOU HAVE GREATLY BLESSED YOUR LAND

The text based on Psalm 85 and written by an unknown author.  The tune is short and sweet, short enough where the seven verses of text won't feel like a marathon.  The tune is one of those rarities that end in the V chord, and the last note of the melody is the fifth of that V chord (for those not so well versed in music theory, the tune is in the key of D, but it ends in the A chord, and the melody ends with an E note).  This kind of ending also takes place in a little-known tune by the late C. Alexander Peloquin, titled "Creative Love".  If you have a Worship II hymnal handy, it's at #257, with the Fred Kaan hymn text, Surrounded by a World of Need.
This tune, like the one I wrote for O that I Could for Ever Dwell, is based on a Gregorian melody from the Liber Usualis, in this case, the Offertory Benedixisti, Domine from III Advent.

SATB hymn

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LORD, I LIFT MY SOUL TO THEE

A rare hymn text based on Psalm 25, taken from The Psalter of 1912, wedded to original music, cleverly dubbed New 25th, written in a style emulating that of the late great Richard Proulx.  Great for Advent, Lent, and even on some days during Ordinary Time.  Makes for a great hymn for I Advent (especially as many parishes still seem to prefer hymns over propers), as the first verse is a paraphrase of the Introit and Offertory appointed for that day.

PDF - Lord, I Lift My Soul to Thee - Unison hymn

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HOW JOYFUL MY EXPRESSING

Original text, based on Psalm 122, set to the familiar tune, Ellacombe (most widely used with such hymns as I sing the mighty pow'r of God, The day of Resurrection, Go, make of all disciples, and O Queen of the Holy Rosary).  This hymn comes in two versions - 1) the standard hymn harmony by William Henry Monk, and 2) a concertato featuring two trumpets, SATB (ending in SSATBB), and, of course, organ.  Both versions come with the melody/text version for the congregation.

PDF's:

standard SATB hymn (W. H. Monk harmony)

concertato for S(S)ATB(B), two trumpets, and organ
(includes instrumental parts!)

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HEAR US, O SHEPHERD LORD OF ISRAEL

A couple of hymns I uploaded ("O That I Could for Ever Dwell" and "God of Mercy, God of Grace"), were texts written in the 19th century set to music by yours truly.

For this little twist, I used the classic tune Old 124th (best known with the hymn "Turn Back, O Man, Forswear Thy Foolish Ways") and added a Psalm 80-based text of my own to fit this 16th century tune.  As an added bonus, I even threw in a descant (in fact, feel free to write in the descant with "Turn Back, O Man", so now you can have it for Lent also)!

The fourth line of each verse is repeated.  Some may ask, "Why not use the shorter tune Toulon and lose the repeat?"  Toulon is nice, too, but sorry, I'm partial to Old 124th.  In Toulon, I feel that something is missing --- yeah, that middle line.

Definitely an Advent hymn, as there are propers from the Graduale (I think the Christmas Vigil might have something, too, if I remember correctly) and a Responsorial Psalm from the Lectionary that use selected verses of Psalm 80 (Psalm 79 in the Latin Vulgate).

SATB hymn with descant

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GOD OF MERCY, GOD OF GRACE

The classic Psalm 67-based text by Henry Francis Lyte (1793-1847), set to a fresh meditative tune that I wrote 22 years ago, now released to the public.  Psalm 67 serves as the appointed Responsorial Psalm once each during Christmas Season, Easter Season, and Ordinary Time.  Makes for a nice benediction-style hymn anytime.  Written for congregation with SATB support and a descant for the final verse!

PDF: God of Mercy, God of Grace - SATB hymn with descant

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GOD GAVE TO US NOT A SPIRIT OF FEAR

...but a spirit strong, loving, wise.

The words of St. Paul, as written in his second letter to St. Timothy.  The three words, "Strong, Loving, Wise", appear on the coat of arms of the Most Reverend Thomas J. Tobin, the eighth (and current) Bishop of my home diocese, Providence.  That is our antiphon for this piece.  The verse text is the hymn, O God of Glory, God of Love, by John Walker.  The music, completely original, is largely influenced by the later compositions of the late C. Alexander Peloquin, longtime director of music at the Cathedral of SS. Peter and Paul, also in Providence.

Responsory: unison antiphon with descnt; SATB verses

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CHRISTUS VINCIT

A Latin responsory based on Psalm 93 (Latin Vulgate Psalm 92).  Written in the fall of 1999, this responsory made its debut at Communion (following the proper) at the Extraordinary Form of Holy Mass for Christ the King at Holy Name of Jesus Church in Providence, Rhode Island, where I served happily from 1999-2003.

This setting of Christus Vincit has a mellower, more mystical flavor.  The antiphon is in the G Lydian mode (signature is key of D, but the tonic is the fourth of the D major scale, G).  We switch over to the key of E major for the verses using the G chord, then the first-inversion D (F-sharp in the bass) as a passing chord, then to the E chord.  OK, so I gave that away.  But the return to the G Lydian takes a rather interesting Peloquin-esque approach that you will have to just see for yourself.

PDF: Christus Vincit  - SATB, Congregation, Chanter(s), Organ

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Thursday, July 23, 2015

CHRISTIANS, LO! THE STAR APPEARETH

Based on the Gospel passage We have seen his star at its rising, and have come with gifts to adore the Lord (Matthew 2:2).  Text by James Arnold Blaisdell.  Original tune from 1991 that I had intended back then to use with the Omer Westendorf text You have looked upon the lowly (which is owned by ICEL, not World Library - surprise, surprise!).  I forgot what I had originally named the tune, but I renamed it after that same Gospel passage in Latin, Vidimus Stellam Ejus, circa 2005.  Tune is short, but intended to be played maestoso (not fast, but with a generously registered organ).  Ideal for Epiphany!


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BLESSED IS HE WHO COMES

Appointed as the Gradual for the early Mass of Christmas morning ("Mass at Dawn"), but the text calls for other uses as well, namely during the season of Easter, and Christ the King.

This piece, which I wrote in 2004, is rather unique.  It has a short, simple unison antiphon for the congregation, followed by an SATB motet-like versicle, then back to the antiphon.  Rather brief, at only 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 minutes long.

Even more unique is that the text here is in English!

SATB, Congregation, and Organ

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BLESSED ARE YOU, O MARY

and Alma Redemptoris Mater

...all in one responsory.  This is a practice that C. Alexander Peloquin employed in some of his work, namely in his Rejoice in Hope and Prayer of Self-Offering (both of which incorporate Ubi Caritas), and In Memory of You (which incorporates Ave Verum).

The antiphon is a paraphrase of the Marian Offertory Felix Namque Es, while the versicles are the Alma Redemptoris Mater, in Latin.  Both of these, the antiphon and the versicles, are set to original music.

PDF - Blessed Are You, O Mary - Unison responsory

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Wednesday, July 22, 2015

AVE MARIA

The Ave Maria (Hail Mary) is, in addition to being that beloved prayer to our Blessed Mother, the appointed Offertory Proper for Sunday IV of Advent and the Immaculate Conception.  These appointed offertories end at et benedictus fructus ventris tui on Advent IV and at Benedicta tu in mulieribus on the Immaculate Conception. However, it's always ok to finish the prayer.

Great to use as an extra anthem or hymn at other Marian feasts and solemnities as well. PLUS: since this setting is written entirely in Latin, you can also use it in an Extraordinary Form Mass.

Two versions are available, as a choral anthem in A-flat, or as a hymn in F. Both contain a copyable congregation part (which is in F in both versions), as well as parts for a string quartet.

PDF's:

Ave Maria - SATB, Organ, and optional Strings, key of A-flat
(ideal as an anthem for SATB or a solo for soprano or tenor)

Ave Maria - SATB, Organ, and optional Strings, key of F
(ideal as a hymn for the congregation or a solo for mezzo or baritone)

Ave Maria - SATB, Organ, and optional Strings, BOTH KEYS
(so you can accommodate EVERYONE!)

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ALLELUIAS AND GOSPEL ACCLAMATIONS

Where Psalm 151 was intended for use after the first reading, Alleluias and Gospel Acclamations is intended for use before the Gospel reading.  These are the Alleluias (during Lent and Passiontide, Gospel Acclamations) from the Roman Missal, in both English and Latin.

The settings are grouped seasonally, so that the people in the congregation may more easily sing them.  Alleluias (and Gospel Acclamations) for major feasts within the Proper of Saints are grouped within the season that they would normally fall.  In the case of Ordinary Time, they are grouped within the weeks that would normally fall in that calendar year (something that would have been much more difficult had we still be using Time after Epiphany and Time after Pentecost).

As for the music: much of the music is based on chants for given times of the year.  In fact, only two of the Alleluias are completely original.  In some cases, even the versicles are based on the chant that matches that of which the Alleluia is based.  In others, Psalm Tones are utilized.

While there are some triple alleluias (the most commonly used in vernacular liturgies), a good chunk are double alleluias.  I decided against the quadruple alleluia and other ghastly monstrosities such as  the six-fold Alleluia, ten-fold Alleluia, repeat-at-every-measure Alleluia, or add-unnecessary-text-to-the-response Alleluia.  Except for Lent and Passiontide, "Alleluia" is all you need, and it is this composer's opinion that three is enough.

You can figure out which Alleluia/Gospel Acclamation to use in the same way you would figure out which Responsorial Psalm to use: by the Liturgical Calendar links on the sidebar: the Complete three-year cycle, and for each of the three current years (which uses dates) - 2015, 2016, and 2017.

Here are the Alleluias, grouped by "season" - there are 13 in total.  Enjoy!

Alleluia "Conditor Alme Siderum" (Advent, includes Immaculate Conception)
Gospel Acclamation "Vexilla Regis" (uses the English response Glory and praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ and the Latin response Gloria et laus tibi, Christe in Latin) (Lent and Passiontide, includes St. Joseph and Annunciation)
Alleluia "O Filii et Filiae" (Easter Season, includes Annunciation for Paschaltide)
Alleluia "Pange Lingua" (Solemnities after Pentecost, includes the fixed date solemnities of St. John the Baptist and SS. Peter and Paul) 
Alleluia for Ordinary Time I (completely original) (Sundays 2-6, includes Presentation of the Lord)
Alleluia Providentiae (excerpted from my outdated Providence Mass) (Sundays 13-17)
Alleluia "Salve Regina" (Sundays 18-22, includes Transfiguration and Assumption)
Alleluia for Ordinary Time V (completely original) (Sundays 23-26, includes the Solemnity of the  Exaltation of the Holy Cross)
Alleluia "Lux Aeterna" (Sundays 27-31, includes All Saints and All Souls)
Alleluia "Christus Vincit" (based on my 1999 Christus Vincit setting) (Sunday 32-Christ the King, includes Dedication of the Lateran Basilica and Thanksgiving Day)

ALLELUIA! ALLELUIA!
Brian Michael Page
July 22, 2015

Alleluia "Christus Vincit"

Alleluia
Dedication of the Lateran Basilica | Sundays of Ordinary Time: 32 | 33
Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe | Thanksgiving Day

Based on a Christus Vincit setting I wrote in the Fall of 1999.

ENGLISH | LATIN

Alleluia "Lux Aeterna"

Alleluia
All Saints | All Souls | Sundays of Ordinary Time: 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31

Response based on the Mode VIII Requiem Communion, Lux Aeterna. Versicles set to Psalm Tone 8.

ENGLISH | LATIN

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Monday, July 20, 2015

Alleluia "Salve Regina"

Alleluia
Transfiguration | Assumption | Sundays of Ordinary Time: 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22

Based on the Mode V Marian chant, Salve Regina.

ENGLISH | LATIN

Alleluia Providentiae

Alleluia
Sundays of Ordinary Time: 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17

The Alleluia used in my old Providence Mass setting from 1997.  The Mass texts for that Mass are now outdated.  There may be a re-work of it at some point in time, but not in the near future.  However, I felt compelled to extract the Alleluia from it, thus the name Alleluia Providentiae.  This Alleluia (as well as the original Providence Mass) is influenced on the most part by some of the compositions of the late C. Alexander Peloquin (1918-1997), who was music director of the Cathedral of my home diocese (SS. Peter and Paul, Providence, RI) for 40 years (1950-1990).

Verses set to Psalm Tone 8.

ENGLISH | LATIN

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Alleluia "Adoremus in Aeternum"

Alleluia
Sundays of Ordinary Time: 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12

Response based on the Benediction anthiphon, Adoremus in Aeternum.  Versicles set to Psalm Tone 5.

ENGLISH | LATIN

Friday, July 17, 2015

Alleluia "O Filii et Filiae"

Easter Vigil | Easter Sunday through Pentecost plus Annunciation

Response from the Mode II Easter chant, O Filii et Filiae.  Versicles set to Psalm Tone 2.

Alleluia
The Easter Vigil in the Holy Night

ENGLISH | LATIN
- Set of instrumental parts (B-flat trumpets, B-flat trombone, F horn, and timpani)
 - (compatible for both English and Latin versions)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Alleluia
Easter Sunday | Sundays of Easter: 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | Ascenstion | Pentecost | Annunciation

ENGLISH | LATIN
- Set of instrumental parts (B-flat trumpets, B-flat trombone, F horn, and timpani)
 - (compatible for both English and Latin versions)

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Gospel Acclamation "Vexilla Regis"

Gospel Acclamation (in lieu of Alleluia)
Ash Wednesday | Sundays of Lent: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Palm Sunday  | Chrism Mass
Holy Thursday | Good Friday | St. Joseph | Annunciation

Based on the Mode I Passion chant, Vexilla Regis Prodeunt

ENGLISH (R. Glory and praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ)
LATIN (R. Glória et laus tibi, Christe)

Alleluia "Divinum Mysterium"

Alleluia
Christmas | Holy Family | Mary, Mother of God | Epiphany | Baptism of the Lord

Based on the Mode V Christmas chant, Divinum Mysterium

ENGLISH | LATIN

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Wednesday, July 08, 2015

KNOW YOUR ROMAN NUMERALS

It is quite often one will see Roman numerals (I, II, III, etc.) in place of Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc.) in my postings, often for numbered Sundays of seasons, and even (stealing my pastor's cue) for the month when writing a date (for example, today, as I write this, is July 8, 2015, or VII-8-15).

I know I'm probably preaching to the choir here, but I find it amazing that far less people are familiar with Roman numerals today than back when I learned them (first grade, that is, somewhere between September, 1970, and June, 1971).  And it was first grade where I also learned that the numbers as we use them today (1, 2, 3, etc.) are Arabic numerals.  (Side note: I also find it amazing that many younger people who work with money for a living, whether it be as a store cashier, bank teller, or even restaurant jobs, are unfamiliar with the terms "fin", "sawbuck", and "two bits".)

Anyhoo, I'm going to combine the two - Roman numerals and money!  Using Roman numerals is very much like counting money.  In United States currency, you have coins and bills (notes) of different value denominations.  Roman numerals is the same thing.  Observe:

I = 1
V = 5
X = 10
L = 50
C = 100
D = 500
M = 1000

When you have three one-dollar bills in your hand, you have three dollars ($3).  Now, let's put three I's together - III - that is three ones (3).  Now, if you put a sawbuck ($10 bill) and a fin ($5 bill) together, you have $15.  In Roman numerals, you put the X and the V together - XV - and you get the number 15.  For 125, you would use a C, two X's, and a V - CXXV.  (Yes, 20 is two X's, there is no special Roman numeral for 20 - it's just XX.)

Roman numerals are basically written in the same order as Arabic numerals, left to right from highest "digit" to lowest "digit".  However, you might see a case where one (and only one) lower "digit" might precede a higher digit.  In that case, you would subtract.  For example, IV is "one from five", which is four.  XL is "ten from fifty", or forty.  Twenty-nine would be rendered XXIX (two tens, plus "one from ten").

One note when subtracting, well, ok, two notes:
1) You can only subtract ONE lower digit from its higher digit.  IIV is not 3, nor is XXC 80.
2) You can only subtract from the next five or ten up.  In other words, 99 cannot be rendered IC.  It would be rendered XCIX (10 from 100, plus 1 from 10).  95 would not be VC, but XCV.  (IV = 4, IX = 9, XL = 40, XC = 90).

In numbering the Sundays, markings such as "II Advent" and "IV Lent" would be the Second Sunday of Advent and the Fourth Sunday of Lent, respectively.  Anything marked "Sunday (numeral)" would be a numbered Sunday of Ordinary Time.  For example, "Sunday X", "Sunday XXIII", "Sunday VI" would mark the Tenth, Twenty-Third, and Sixth Sundays of Ordinary Time, respectively.

Here endeth my basic lesson on Roman numerals.
Peace,
BMP

PS: The other term I didn't cover: "Two bits" is a quarter (25 cents). ;)